Micah Mandate

The Magazine of the J.V. Morsch Center for Social Justice at Trevecca Nazarene University.

Trevecca Urban Farm gets a grant

by Rebekah Warran, Staff Writer This summer, the Urban Farm received a $25,000 grant from Nazarene Compassionate Ministries (NCM) to serve the local Nashville community. NCM is an organization that partners with the Nazarene churches around the world to help those in need. The region that surrounds Trevecca, particularly the Napier and Chestnut Hill areas, are considered to be a food desert,” said Jamie Casler, director of the J.V. Morsch Center for Social Justice.   “The people in our community do not have access to healthy foods within three to five miles,” he said. The money donated with go to multiple projects that are taking place in the farm. Some will go to green house development and expansion and the majority will go

Compassion mobile experience comes to Trevecca

By Bailey Basham Compassion International’s mobile experience “Change The Story” recently made a visit to the campus of Trevecca Nazarene University . Compassion currently provides food, education, and security for nearly 1.6 million children living in poverty around the world in 26 different countries. This experience is designed to show its participants a world that is unlike any other they have been exposed to before. “The Compassion Experience allows people of opportunity to see what life was like for these Compassion graduates and will hopefully spark some ideas for how they might be able to work towards a solution,” said Heather Daugherty, associate chaplain at Trevecca. As a part of this experience, visitors are given an iPod

Salguero challenges students; receives annual social justice award

Rev. Gabriel Salguero speaks at the annual social justice conference. By Emily Mowry On the last day of Trevecca’s annual Social Justice Conference, the speaker gave attendees a reason to go home. Rev. Gabriel Salguero, pastor of the Lamb’s Church of the Nazarene in Manhattan, challenged conference participants to begin the work of justice by listening in their communities. “The first job of justice workers is to listen,” Salguero told attendees. “Because to respond to a challenge that is nonexistent… or to defend where the devil is not attacking, is to become an ally of the devil.” Salguero, as president of National Latino Evangelical Coalition, has spent hours listening to immigrants as he’s led efforts to welcome and care

Social Justice Graduate is Using Her Degree

By Brennen Finchum There’s a young lady that lives in an orphanage in the village of Vidrare, Bulgaria.   She looks like she’s about 7 or 8 years old, but appearances aren’t always as they seem. She’s actually 23.   She has to have to wheelchair to get around and she cannot speak.   The life this young lady has lived is beyond anything someone can completely understand, even if Myers-Briggs said you were an ENFP.   Maybe it’s the fear of past experiences. Maybe she just wants to be independent. Or maybe she’s tired of being pitied. For whatever reason, she doesn’t

Salguero challenges students; receives annual social justice award

Rev. Gabriel Salguero speaks at the annual social justice conference. By Emily Mowry On the last day of Trevecca’s annual Social Justice Conference, the speaker gave attendees a reason to go home. Rev. Gabriel Salguero, pastor of the Lamb’s Church of the Nazarene in Manhattan, challenged conference participants to begin the work of justice by listening in their communities. “The first job of justice workers is to listen,” Salguero told attendees. “Because to respond to a challenge that is nonexistent… or to defend where the devil is not attacking, is to become an ally of the devil.” Salguero,

Trevecca Urban Farm gets a grant

by Rebekah Warran, Staff Writer This summer, the Urban Farm received a $25,000 grant from Nazarene Compassionate Ministries (NCM) to serve the local Nashville community. NCM is an organization that partners with the Nazarene churches around the world to help those in need. The region that surrounds Trevecca, particularly the Napier and Chestnut Hill areas, are considered to be a food desert,” said Jamie Casler, director of the J.V. Morsch Center for Social Justice.   “The people in our community do not have access to healthy foods within three to five miles,” he said. The money